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Sacred Land Initiatives
Sacred Land new clinic building (top with red roof) in Namche Bazaar
clinic
Clinic
Namche Bazaar is a busy trading town on the trail to the base camp of  Mount Everest. In the last thirty years the number of outside visitors to the area has grown dramatically.Now there are many lodges  and hotels which cater to the trekkers. A tourist bazaar has also sprung up as well as some very good bakeries. On Saturdays there is the local bazaar where the villagers from the south come to sell their produce such as vegetables and rice. There is also a colourful Tibetan bazaar where traders from Tingri sell cheap Chinese goods as well as local Tibetan butter, wool and meat. Everything is traded at Namche Bazaar from baby Yaks to old mountaineering equipment.

Although the population of Namche is relatively small, because of the trekkers, traders and porters the clinic is busy. Every week sixty or more patients visit the clinic and the doctors make house calls to patients in outlying villages at least two times per week. There is  an excellent allopathic clinic at Khunde, but the traditional clinic has become very popular with patients finding the medicine very effective especially for long-term chronic ailments which western  medicine often has not treatment for. Therefore, the traditional medical facilities provided by the clinic are much appreciated and a 
great success.

In addition the doctors have provided free medical care at important gatherings of the community such as the great prayer festival at the cave sacred to Guru Rinpoche at Hallesie. This is in a distict just south of Solu Khumbu in the heavily populated foot  hills. The festival was held for the first time in 2001 and was a  huge success. It was led by Trulshik Rinpoche with Tengboche  Rinpoche, over 1000 monks, nuns and practioners and 6000 Sherpa from all sections of the community.


 

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